Get Adobe Flash player
NAS Part II - Underwater Archaeology Field Project
NAS Two Practical Work
Intermediate certificate in foreshore and underwater archaeology
 
Aims:
NAS2The NAS Part II offers students the opportunity to put into practice some of the things they learned in NAS Part I and is a field archaeology course. Research projects of personal interest are encouraged but most students will carry out the work required for this qualification as part of a group on a field school, or with other members of their local diving club. In addition to the survey work, the NAS Part II requires that the student demonstrate a commitment to understanding what they are doing, by attending two archaeological conferences.
 
Dr. Holley will assist in project design and execution and students will be allowed to participate in larger projects within Grand Traverse Bay. Foreshore projects will be developed for non divers. The course is offered on a flexible time schedule and is based on individual availability and weather conditions. Contact Dr. Holley if you are interested in taking this course for academic credit.
 
Course Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, a student will have:
 
  • completed an archaeological project in the field;
  • planned and completed a basic pre-disturbance archaeological site survey;
  • gained considerable practical skills in underwater surveying and recording;
  • created a short project survey report and submitted it to NAS;
  • presented their report at the annual NAS-NMC Summit in Traverse City;
  • attended 2 days of  archaeological conferences. 
 
Topics Covered:
  • Methods, techniques, and technologies in underwater archaeology
  • Survey practical
  • Report writing and post field data processing
  • Public speaking and presentation 
 
Syllibus:To download a sample Syllibus click here.
 
Cost:
The cost for the course is $400.
 
Suggested Reading:
Archaeology Underwater, The NAS Guide to Principles and Practice. A Bowens (ed). 2008. Blackwell, London
 
Course Instructor: Dr. Mark W. Holley